Recently Appointed Professors

Professors introduced at the December 2013 Faculty of Medicine meeting.

Please click here to view event photos from previous Faculty of Medicine meetings and the most recent December 19, 2013 meeting
Heidelise Als
Katrina Armstrong
Karen K. Ballen
David Bangsberg
Bradley Bernstein
David Borsook
Mark P. Callery
Yolanda L. Colson
Darlene A. Dartt
Irene S. Davis
Marcelo F. Di Carli
Emad N. Eskandar
Judith A. Ferry
Michael A. Fifer
Arnold S. Freedman

Robert E. Gerszten
David D. Ginty
Francine Grodstein
Hiroto Hatabu
Zhigang He
Udo Hoffmann
Michael R. Jaff
James L. Januzzi
Keith A. Johnson
Ted Kaptchuk
Walter E. Kaufmann
Alexandra B. Kimball
Randall W. King
Michael H. Lev
Kenneth D. Mandl

D. Branch Moody
Karl Münger
Esther Oliva
Igor F. Palacios
Pere Puigserver
Samuel D. Rabkin
Paul G. Richardson
Deborah Schrag
Michael A. Schwarzschild
Christopher A. Shera
Susan A. Slaugenhaupt
Daniel S. Talmor
Louise Edith Wilkins-Haug
Ramnik Xavier
Lee Zou

Heidelise Als

Dr. Als is Professor of Psychology in the Department of Psychiatry at Boston Children’s Hospital where she is the Director of Neurobehavioral Infant and Child Studies. Dr. Als is a recognized leader in the developmental assessment and care of preterm and high-risk infants focusing on how early experiences and care affect later brain and emotional development. She also founded the Newborn Individualized Developmental Care and Assessment Program (NIDCAP) for the care of preterm infants and their families.

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Katrina Armstrong

Dr. Armstrong is the Jackson Professor of Clinical Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital where she is Chief of the Department of Medicine. Focusing at the interface of genomics, cancer and social policy, she has translated genomics advances into improvements in cancer control and identified novel mechanisms underlying cancer disparities. Currently, her research seeks to improve outcomes of breast cancer screening through personalized approaches.

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Karen K. Ballen

Dr. Ballen is Professor of Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital and serves as the Director of the Leukemia Program at MGH. She is an expert in umbilical cord blood transplantation, a novel approach to extend stem cell transplantation to patients without matched donors. Her work focuses on strategies to improve the safety of the cord blood transplant procedures.

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Bradley Bernstein

Dr. Bernstein is Professor of Pathology at Massachusetts General Hospital and co-Director of the Epigenomics Program at the Broad Institute. He has pioneered the study of chromatin and epigenetics at a genome-wide scale. His work is notable for the discovery of epigenetic mechanisms in pluripotent stem cells, the systematic identification of enhancer ‘switches’ in the human genome that coincide with genetic variants associated with common diseases, and the characterization of aberrant regulatory circuits in cancer.

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David Borsook

Dr. Borsook is Professor of Anesthesiology at Boston Children’s Hospital and the Director of the Pain and Imaging Neuroscience Group at BCH, Massachusetts General Hospital and McLean Hospital. He uses functional imaging to investigate chronic pain, including migraine, and measurement of brain responses to analgesics in children and adults. Research by his group seeks to define brain biomarkers for disease state and treatment effects.

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Mark P. Callery

Dr. Callery is Professor of Surgery at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center where he serves as the Chief of the Division of General Surgery. He is a recognized leader in the fields of pancreatic, hepatobiliary, and advanced minimally-invasive gastrointestinal surgery. His research program evaluates quality assessment metrics in high-acuity surgery.

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Yolanda L. Colson

Dr. Colson is Professor of Surgery at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. She is a cardiothoracic surgeon and the Director of the Women’s Lung Cancer Program. Her research focuses on the development of unique mechanisms of polymer and nanoparticle drug delivery aimed at preventing cancer recurrence, as well as gender differences in the risk, diagnosis, and treatment of lung cancer.

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Darlene A. Dartt

Dr. Dartt is Professor of Ophthalmology at the Schepens Eye Research Institute. Her research has advanced the area of neural regulation of tear production by focusing on cellular signaling mechanisms used by nerves to stimulate lacrimal gland and conjunctival goblet cell secretion and their role in ocular surface inflammatory diseases such as dry eye. Additional research has focused on the role of conjunctival goblet cells in ocular inflammation and its resolution and in preventing bacterial conjunctivitis.

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Irene S. Davis

Dr. Davis is Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital where she serves as the Director of the Spaulding National Running Center. Her biomechanical research has elucidated many of the faulty gait patterns associated with common, and often disabling, musculoskeletal injuries. She is a pioneer in the area of gait retraining to alter these faulty movement patterns in both walking and running, with the overarching goal of helping people remain active throughout their lifetime.

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Marcelo F. Di Carli

Dr. Di Carli is Professor of Radiology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. He is the Chief of the Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging and the Director of the Noninvasive Cardiovascular Imaging Program. He uses positron emission tomography to study cardiovascular disease and has made major contributions on the use of quantitative imaging of myocardial blood flow and metabolism to the study of cardiac pathophysiology, as well as diagnosis and risk assessment of patients with cardiovascular disease.

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Emad N. Eskandar

Dr. Eskandar is Professor of Neurosurgery at Massachusetts General Hospital. He is also the Director of Functional Neurosurgery and of Residency Training. Dr. Eskandar leads an active multidisciplinary program employing cutting-edge surgical treatments for movement disorders, epilepsy, and pain and an active basic research laboratory investigating the Basal Ganglia.

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Judith A. Ferry

Dr. Ferry is Professor of Pathology at the Massachusetts General Hospital where she is the Director of Hematopathology. Her interests include the full range of hematopathology, with focus on the diagnosis and subclassification of lymphomas. She has a special interest in lymphomas arising in extranodal sites and has studied the risk factors for their development, defining the range of their clinical and pathological features.

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Michael A. Fifer

Dr. Fifer is Professor of Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital where he is the Director of the Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Program and the Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory. A recognized authority on hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and invasive hemodynamics, he has led efforts to refine the technique of alcohol septal ablation and establish its place in the management of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Research by his group has also advanced pharmacologic treatment of the disease.

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Arnold S. Freedman

Dr. Freedman is Professor of Medicine at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute where he serves as the Clinical Director of the Lymphoma Program. He is an internationally recognized authority on the development and assessment of novel forms of therapy for patients with lymphoproliferative disorders. His research has focused on assessing various forms of immunotherapies and defining the role of autologous stem cell transplants in patients with B cell non-Hodgkins lymphomas.

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Robert E. Gerszten

Dr. Gerszten is Professor of Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital. He is the Director of Clinical and Translational Research for the MGH Institute for Heart, Vascular and Stroke Care. His research focuses on the nexus of cardiac and metabolic diseases where he uses emerging mass-spectrometry-based technologies to discover new biomarkers and pathways contributing to artheogenesis and its complications.

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David D. Ginty

Dr. Ginty is Professor of Neurobiology at Harvard Medical School. He is a pioneer in molecular genetics and developmental neuroscience with a particular emphasis on understanding the development, organization, and function of neurons of the peripheral nervous system. His research is currently focused on understanding the organizational logic of neural circuits that underlie the sense of touch.

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Francine Grodstein

Dr. Grodstein is Professor of Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital where she is the Director of the Nurses’ Health Study, one of the premier research studies of women’s health and chronic disease prevention. She has pioneered large-scale studies of cognitive decline in older women as part of her research focus on aging. She has recently focused on applying novel computerized techniques for measuring cognitive function in younger persons (i.e., middle age) and identifying health and lifestyle factors which determine the earliest stages of cognitive decline.

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Hiroto Hatabu

Dr. Hatabu is Professor of Radiology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital where he serves as the Clinical Director of the BWH MRI Program and as the Medical Director of the BWH Center for Pulmonary Functional Imaging. He is a pioneer in the development and application of imaging techniques that are used to quantitatively evaluate pulmonary function. His clinical and research interest is currently focused on image-based phenotyping of lung diseases with genomic correlations.

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Zhigang He

Dr. He is Professor of Neurology at Children’s Hospital Boston. He is a leading investigator in the study of axon regeneration. His lab has provided important insights into designing therapeutic strategies for restoring functions after brain and spinal cord injury.

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Udo Hoffmann

Dr. Hoffmann is Professor of Radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital where he is the Chief of the Division of Cardiac Imaging in the Department of Radiology and the Director of the Cardiac MR PET CT Program at MGH. He is a pioneer in noninvasive cardiovascular imaging. His main interest is to translate advanced coronary atherosclerosis imaging to improved cardiovascular risk assessment, patient management, and outcomes in both asymptomatic and symptomatic individuals in a safe and cost effective manner.

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Michael R. Jaff

Dr. Jaff is Professor of Medicine and Chair of the Massachusetts General Hospital Institute for Heart, Vascular and Stroke Care. As a vascular medicine specialist, Dr. Jaff has established the role of duplex ultrasonography to determine the safety and efficacy of devices used for the treatment of blood vessel diseases as endpoints for multicenter, International clinical trials.

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James L. Januzzi

Dr. Januzzi is Professor of Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital where he serves as the Director of the Cardiac Intensive Care Unit. He is a recognized leader in the study of biomarkers in heart disease and has pioneered the use of several novel blood tests for a wide range of diagnoses, including heart failure and acute myocardial infarction. Work by his study group has set international standards for the use of the natriuretic peptides for diagnosis, prognosis, and management of heart failure, while simultaneously exploring more novel biomarkers, including ST2, galectin-3, and the highly sensitive troponins.

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Keith A. Johnson

Dr. Johnson is Professor of Radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital. He is the Director of Molecular Neuroimaging. Dr. Johnson specializes in dementing disorders and uses a novel in vivo PET technique to detect protein deposits.

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Ted Kaptchuk

Mr. Kaptchuk is Professor of Medicine at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center where he is the Director of the Program in Placebo Studies and Therapeutic Encounter. His research on placebo effects is notable for its multi-disciplinary approach. He is also a scholar of East Asian medicine, medical pluralism, and the history of research methods.

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Walter E. Kaufmann

Dr. Kaufmann is Professor of Neurology at Boston Children’s Hospital, where he is the Director of the Rett Syndrome Program, Co-Director of the Fragile X Syndrome and Down Syndrome Programs, and Clinical Director of the Translational Neuroscience Center. He is a recognized leader in translational research in genetic disorders associated with intellectual disability. His work, which covers the experimental to clinical range, has helped to define autism in these disorders as well as to develop new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches.

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Alexandra B. Kimball

Dr. Kimball is Professor of Dermatology at Massachusetts General Hospital. She is the Senior Vice President for Practice Improvement at the Massachusetts General Physician Organization, Vice Chair of the Department of Dermatology and Director of the Clinical Unit for Research Trials and Outcomes in Skin. She is widely recognized for her work on psoriasis, physician workforce economics, clinical trials and outcomes research in Dermatology.

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Randall W. King

Dr. King is the Harry C. McKenzie Professor of Cell Biology at Harvard Medical School. He directs the first year medical school course, Molecular and Cellular Basis of Medicine and has spearheaded innovations in curriculum development in medical and graduate education. His group has pioneered new pharmacological approaches to alter protein degradation in cells, with potential applications in cancer and neurodegenerative disease.

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Michael H. Lev

Dr. Lev is Professor of Radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, where he serves as Director of Emergency Neuroradiology and the Radiology Neurovascular Laboratory. He is a recognized leader in the development and optimization of CT imaging techniques for the detection, diagnosis, and therapeutic triage of patients with acute stroke and other neurovascular disorders. He is also pioneering “Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy” – a portable technology that may provide rapid, affordable, point-of-care assessment of acute brain injury in an ambulance, the battlefield, or the intensive care unit.

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Kenneth D. Mandl

Dr. Mandl is Professor of Pediatrics at Boston Children’s Hospital where he directs the Intelligent Health Laboratory. He works at the intersection of epidemiology, health services research, and informatics and serves as faculty in the HMS Center for Biomedical Informatics. Dr. Mandl has pioneered using information technology and big data in biosurveillance and consumer engagement, and now leads a transformative initiative to design the “app store for health.”

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D. Branch Moody

Dr. Moody is Professor of Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Dr. Moody is in the Division of Rheumatology, Immunology and Allergy and investigates the cellular mechanisms leading to human T cell activation during infection and autoimmune diseases. His laboratory has discovered previously unknown molecules and enzymatic pathways that control the human immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

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Karl Münger

Dr. Münger is Professor of Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. He has made seminal contributions to the delineation of the carcinogenic activities of human papillomaviruses. Infections with these viruses cause approximately 5% of all human cancers, worldwide, most prominently cervical carcinoma.

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Esther Oliva

Dr. Oliva is Professor of Pathology at Massachusetts General Hospital. She is a senior member of the groups responsible for gynecologic and urologic pathology and has focused on the topic of mesenchymal tumors of the uterus. She has described several new entities with important clinical significance depending on their correct classification and has elaborated on their molecular features, some of them having major prognostic and therapeutic implications.

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Igor F. Palacios

Dr. Palacios is Professor of Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital. He is the Director of both the Interventional Cardiology Program and the Interventional Cardiology Fellowship Program at MGH. He is an expert in the field of interventional cardiology and a pioneer in percutaneous interventions for structural heart disease.

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Pere Puigserver

Dr. Puigserver is Professor of Cell Biology at Harvard Medical School and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. His work has made major contributions to understanding how fundamental metabolic and energetic processes function in mammals to maintain nutrient homeostasis and survival. These processes are dysregulated in metabolic diseases, cancer and age-associated diseases and represent therapeutic targets.

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Samuel D. Rabkin

Dr. Rabkin is Professor of Neurosurgery at Massachusetts General Hospital where he also serves as the Co-Director of the Brain Tumor Research Center. He has been a pioneer in the development of herpes simplex virus vectors for treating neurologic disorders and the field of oncolytic virotherapy. Members of his laboratory investigate cancer stem cells in tumors of the nervous system and therapeutic strategies to enhance oncolytic virotherapy.

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Paul G. Richardson

Dr. Richardson is Professor of Medicine and the Clinical Director of the Jerome Lipper Multiple Myeloma Cancer Center at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. He is an internationally recognized expert in multiple myeloma, particularly for his pioneering development of lenalidomide, bortezomib, and dexamethasone (so called RVD), which is currently one of the most widely used and effective combinations in the upfront treatment of multiple myeloma.

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Deborah Schrag

Dr. Schrag is Professor of Medicine at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute where she is chief of the Division of Population Sciences and also leads the outcomes research program for the Dana Farber Harvard Cancer Center. She is a health services researcher whose work has identified deficits in the quality and effectiveness of cancer treatment. She has pioneered strategies to improve cancer care at the individual, health system, and population level.

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Michael A. Schwarzschild

Dr. Schwarzschild is Professor of Neurology at Massachusetts General Hospital and leads the North American Parkinson Study Group, conducting clinical trials to improve therapies for Parkinson’s disease. His research has identified the neuroprotective potential and mechanisms of purines such as caffeine and urate. His group’s findings have provided a biological basis for established epidemiology of Parkinson’s, and have accelerated clinical development of adenosine receptor antagonists and the urate precursor inosine for treating the disease.

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Christopher A. Shera

Dr. Shera is Professor of Otology and Laryngology in the Eaton-Peabody Laboratories at the Massachusetts Eye & Ear Infirmary, where he directs the Auditory Physics Group. He is a leading expert in physiological acoustics, auditory mechanics, and the noninvasive assessment of hearing function. His research focuses on how the ear amplifies, analyzes, and emits sound.

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Susan A. Slaugenhaupt

Dr. Slaugenhaupt is Professor of Neurology at Massachusetts General Hospital where she is a MGH Research Scholar and co-Director of the Genetics and Genomics Unit of the MGH Clinical Research Program. Her research is focused on gene discovery and therapy development. Her discoveries have led to the development of a drug for familial dysautonomia targeted at correcting mRNA missplicing.

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Daniel S. Talmor

Dr. Talmor is Professor of Anaesthesia at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center where he serves as the Vice Chair for Critical Care Medicine in the Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine. His research group focuses on the early identification, prevention and treatment of critical illness. Among these treatments, they have pioneered novel methods for delivery of mechanical ventilation.

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Louise Edith Wilkins-Haug

Dr. Wilkins-Haug is Professor of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital where she is the director of the Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine and Reproductive Genetics. She is a leader in prenatal genetics, fetal medicine and minimally invasive fetal therapies and focuses on the integration of prenatal genetic education and assessment into obstetric care and the provision of fetal treatment. She has also adapted neonatal valve dilation procedures to the fetus, which has enabled the in utero treatment of congenital cardiac disease, most notably evolving hypoplastic left heart syndrome.

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Ramnik Xavier

Dr. Xavier is the Kurt J. Isselbacher Professor of Medicine in the Field of Gastroenterology at Massachusetts General Hospital and serves as the Chief of the Division of Gastroenterology. His research focuses on discovering and understanding the function of important mediators and effectors involved in both the innate and adaptive immune systems. Of particular interest are the cellular components and regulatory networks that interact dynamically within temporal, spatial and pathophysiological contexts of innate immunity.

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Lee Zou

Dr. Zou is Professor of Pathology at Massachusetts General Hospital where he serves as the Associate Scientific Director of the MGH Cancer Center. His work has contributed to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of DNA damage signaling and DNA repair in human cells. His findings have also shed new light on the genomic instability in cancer cells, presenting new opportunities for radio/chemotherapy and targeted cancer therapy.

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